Office of Pro Life

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Supreme Court upheld freedom of speech for pro-life Americans in a June 26 decision in the case of McCullen v. Coakley. The Court unanimously declared unconstitutional a Massachusetts law barring pro-life advocates from public sidewalks near abortion facilities.  Cardinal Seán P. O’Malley of Boston, chairman of the U.S. bishops’ Committee on Pro-Life Activities, issued the following statement.

WASHINGTON — Catholics can observe the 41st anniversary of the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion in the United States by participating in nine days of prayer, penance and pilgrimage by attending local events and by joining a nationwide novena via email, text, app and other formats, said the chairman of the Committee on Pro-Life Activities of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) issued a “Special Message” at the conclusion of their fall General Assembly, November 13, in Baltimore. USCCB regulations regarding statements and publications define a Special Message as a statement, only issued at general meetings, that the general membership considers appropriate in view of the circumstances at the time. The message was passed unanimously.

WASHINGTON — Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore, chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Ad Hoc Committee for Religious Liberty, welcomed the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision Tuesday, Nov. 26, to hear arguments in the cases of Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. and Conestoga Wood Specialties.

WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Pro-Life Activities wrote to members of the House of Representatives to support the “Abortion Insurance Full Disclosure Act” (H.R. 3279), to address one part of the abortion-related problem in the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

By Frank J. Moncher, PhD
Domestic violence is a hidden scourge on our families and communities. Those who are victimized often keep it a private matter for various reasons: fear, shame, well-intended efforts to preserve the family. Aggressors, if they even recognize their problem, are not likely to have it addressed. Yet it touches many, and knows no boundaries of race, social class, ethnicity, creed or age (most victims are first abused as teens).